Energy and Climate

Mason Cummings, The Wilderness Society

Reclaiming our wildlands from destructive energy practices

Despite the many intended uses for our lands—conservation, recreation and cultural preservation among them—energy companies now control millions of acres of America’s wild public lands. They have one purpose: to produce coal, oil and gas. Reckless drilling and mining scars the land, pollutes our air and water, damages habitat, threatens vulnerable communities and destroys cultural sites, such as unexcavated archeological ruins.  

Fossil fuel energy extracted from public lands also contributes heavily to climate change. While renewable energy projects will help lessen those emissions, we need to be smart about where we place such development. If they are sited in the wrong places, or without proper safeguards, large-scale renewable projects on public lands can do more harm than good.

Public lands belong to all Americans, not just the energy industry. That's why we are leading the way to protect wildlands and special places from drilling and reduce emissions from public lands. We’re working to promote renewable energy development in the right places so our public lands can fully contribute to our national climate solution.

Our solutions

We work to preserve places that are Too Wild to Drill and ensure that our public lands are part of a national climate solution. We do this by fighting drilling proposals in unacceptable places, advancing policies to reduce climate emissions, advancing clean renewable energy and by addressing the impacts of drilling on communities.